This Holocaust Author's Auschwitz Blog

This Holocaust Author's Auschwitz Blog

This blog describes my thoughts and experiences in visiting Auschwitz, Belzec, Majdanek and Sobibor and Anne Frank's House from 2014 to 2018

I blogged my preparations for my visit, I posted daily during my visit to Poland...there are also my ongoing thoughts posted here; in the aftermath of my visit...
(Please note due to the sensitive nature of this blog, and the prevalence of trolls, comments have been blocked)

Delatyn

HolocaustPosted by P.A. Draigh Fri, August 17, 2018 00:07:16

Who would believe how the Germans would and did act as civilisation and enlightenment were confronted by a Jewish People so used to oppression. Fundamentally, the Jews of the Diaspora had never considered itself exposed to the capricious nature and terms of any systematic annihilation, though brutalisation had been meted out to them for millennia. However, all too many Germans and other nationals became emboldened by the hate filled words of Hitler and enacted upon his rancid vocabulary with like minded and unequalled a murderous interpretation. Embedded in German minds, and as the tide of hatred spread wider and fanned out across Europe, the Jewish People were labelled as guilty of all that ailed them, and as Jews they were wholly detained. Wherever the Jewish People were found, these Jews were contained as Jews and they were subsequently Murdered as Jews. This is true whether they were found and shot or gassed, starved or hanged at the Death Camps, Killing Sites or the Ghetto’s. Places like BabiYar, Belzec, Kovno, the Warsaw Ghetto or here at Delatyn all reverberate with the stench of atrocity.

What we now know of Delatyn, its name in German, Polish and in English, or Delatin in Hungarian was also known as Deliatin from its Yiddish name and even to its Russian transference as Delyatin. It is also known as Dilyatyn in its Ukrainian form and is all so often written as Delyatin, Delyatyn, Diljatyn and Dilyatyn. No matter how the name was spread, all Jews of Delatyn came to know the horror that was to present itself to them. None of this consideration however, what its space name, none of these did make a single bit of difference to Jewish existence. Wherever the Nazi’s were to find a Jewish presence, that Jewish existence would be eradicated. Nor had Hitler’s murderous intention prevented what was a pliant mass of other national’s, who colluded in this final resolve, applying Hitler’s demands for all and any Jews to be murdered where they were found. Everywhere, and there were all too many with their own negative outlook toward the Jews, immediately readied themselves and became more than willing to act in a murderous fashion, no matter their own national allegiance.

What is also certain, in all of these spaces occupied by the Jewish Murdered, is that the Jews had been given no choice whatsoever but to resist the hatred against them with their very lives. In the first place, any of these Jewish People, who were being singled out systematically and sought out from their community’s, had nowhere to escape to, and certainly nowhere to hide. For the longest while they might well have considered that physical work awaited them as resettlement transports anticipated their removal. Finally though, and while these detained and entrained Jews might well have realised that certain death then awaited them, what was the entirety of these Jewish Families expected to do? For those Jews who could actually manage to escape, it became perfectly clear to all those on the outside, that escape would be a futile exercise in retribution levelled against those remaining on the inside. Also, we have now considered the worldly expressions of the time, and while we heard the refrain that one Jew was too many, this all was as an example of the Jewish abandonment.

Clearly abandoned by a World not seeking to import a Jewish Question, let alone any problems they might incur, European Jewry was decimated. Individually, isolationist intolerance that was evoked amongst nations and was an expression clearly raised, did not allow for Jews to be considered worthy of World assistance. In fact, for the world to then accept what it considered it had no wish to import was abandoned to Hitler and his nazi cohorts to resolve its own Jewish Question. Though East European Jewry, Polish, Ukrainian, Byelorussian or Russian Jews might well have been unaware of World intention ranged against them, or of the shameful debate over who actually wanted them, such vast tracts of a continent ruled over by Hitler’s legions was a collective raged against Jewish existence where escape proved impossible. There is also a certain loathing I have encountered, but only in certain small Jewish quarters, against those very Jews who were forced to make a choice were no choice existed.

Those who dissent my understanding of this observance, of a no choice ordeal for 6,000,000 Jews of Europe, can say what ever they wish about the Books I have placed before the World. There are x4 books now which are stand alone in their condemnations of what was perpetrated against all of these 6,000,000 Jews and for what we as a supposedly christian grouping of nations allowed to happen. Should I have written these books when I am clearly a non-Jew, aiming shots at non-Jews for what we, an ostensibly ‘christian’ grouping, both perpetrated and allowed to happen. My opinion is of course I should have written even more on the subject of The Holocaust and I should not be denied that opportunity because I am not a Jew. For the many of you who have lent me their details on Family, who have measured your responses as to loss, the comments on places like Delatyn and Jaworzno are important. While there are so many other atrocity’s within The Holocaust term, please do not consider me unappreciative of that shared experience concerning these corners of that vast narrative.

While it is essential that I write, I do not have any ulterior motive in assessing the human loss of those Jews other than Always to Remember, Never to Forget. I am here to stand for 6,000,000 European Jews and in their stead I afford a missing voice to the resonating echo of their fading presence. In this History that has taken these 6,000,000 Jews of your kin from us, this is where I will gain a little more from the search which I have begun. I am deeply indebted to the many friends who have allowed me to add more words to the overall cost to you all by your shared concern for what must not disappear, what must never be forgotten and must always be remembered, 6,000,000 Jewish lives plundered from us. I also acknowledge the greater debt owed to the Jewish Survivor who is troubled consistently by our demands to know more than we have yet learned. For you too, the Jewish People who must struggle more with that very loss, know too the sentiment of that loss is pertinent and personal to me.

For those of you who seek out the same pathway toward this learning from the incomprehensible, it is a journey that I travel willingly and we each do so in communion with a cause greater than mere memory can hold. So for those who read all I have to say, I will return to the scenes of the most despicable crimes ever perpetrated. That said, in each and every Jewish Community were atrocity was visited, were unconcern was expressed and intolerance’s were enacted, individual spaces hold individual traumas the like of which we cannot know and therefore, bear no comparison to anything History has lent us previously. In my effort, I will do all that I can to pay due respect to the position of those places such as Chelmno, Delatyn, Majdanek, Ponary and Rumbuli, where the totality of what was achieved in each and every space dedicated to lost but not forgotten memory, all are adding to an atrocity now detailed as the murder of 6,000,000 Jewish People.

What began in Hitler’s fetid mind as The Final Solution of The JEWISH Question, die Endlosung der JUDENFRAGE, became what is acknowledged by most as The Holocaust. There are lessons to be learned even from the lost, who can so expressly teach us, even from within The Holocaust, the moral warnings to be learned about intolerance and even indifference. Much of the information that so many of you have passed on to me is in relation to spaces not unheard of but little known. For what transpired here in Delatyn, or many such little Towns, Shtetl’s and Villages, much of which is still as yet unknown to History, we broaden our understanding by acknowledging the significant detail of individual places were atrocity was significantly meted out. You have given meaning to these places of People, and a personal insight into what Bialystok, Delatyn, Lodz, Sobibor, Treblinka or Wlodawa must establish as the Jews who had entered them were extinguished from.

But before we delve fully into the complexity of the overall atrocity that is The Holocaust, I will draw your attention to Delatyn, an almost insignificant Shtetl in the midst of the greater tragedy which is The Holocaust. Here, this tiny holding, which thrived with 3,000 Jews, has added to the more losses of the Jewish lives who were murdered in situ. Also, Delatyn’s Jews were Murdered elsewhere or in Belzec, and is recognised as part and parcel of the greater tragedy that is 6,000,000 Murdered Jews of Europe. Before we arrive at the overall calamity though, we must immerse ourselves in the history which took the Jews of Delatyn more than 500 years to fully establish. While Hitler envisaged Poland as a massive graveyard for Polish Jewry, and eventually then for the Jews of Europe, Delatyn remained isolated from the immediate effects until 1939 when Hitler sent his invading forces into Poland. Of course, and all too often and far too regularly we come across individual atrocity's which defy our conscious ability to discern.

As with any form of comprehension that is a measure of the incomprehensible, Delatyn is a Shtetl or Town which has given its sizeable Jewish community to memory. Delatyn is but one such instance where we are brought to the limits of our eager understanding of that certain fall from grace of a supposed civilised German nation. Here was an Eastern Galician Shtetl, which at the time of The Holocaust ambled along, residing as it did so along the course of the River Pruth. Here, on the approaches to the Carpathian mountains, such idyllic splendour was crushed beyond human understanding when Hitler’s forces established a brutal regime fixated on the Jews and their destruction. Prior to World War I, the Shtetl of Delatyn was a tiny part of the old established Austro-Hungarian Empire mixing amongst compatriots with daily struggles they seemed well able to cope with. Even between the two world wars Delatyn belonged to the Polish nation and only added to the catastrophe for Polish Jewry once it was enacted by the Hitlerite arrival.

Delatyn was now home to more than 3,000 Jewish People, a rather vibrant, energetic and productive Jewish community until Hitler's invading Armies breached their often times strained persistence amongst their Polish non-Jewish neighbours. Assault and brutal enactment’s raged against the Jews here but it was not until after Hitler invaded Russia in June 1941, when the escalation toward a Final Solution was concentrated also upon Delatyn Jewry. Firstly though, we have to recognise that there was a presence of Jews here in Delatyn around 1370 ad and their establishment as a community was almost unremarkable in the more than 200 years for laws to establish any rights to all who resided within its confines. The first written mention of Delatyn dates from 1370 and in 1578 the Magdeburg’s progressed the law and then prosperity was fully confirmed with the establishment of a salt mine business emerging there. Within 300 years the industry of salt extraction prospered further the entire area and the realisation so of the medicinal soothing quality of the salt springs brought a further flourish of resource, as a resort was established.

Delatyn is now becoming more and more cosmopolitan. By 1765 there were 87 Jews living in Delatyn and then in 1880, with a population of 4,495, of these 1,577 were Jews. This represented 35.08% of the population. By 1890 there were 5,195 residents of whom 2,096 were Jews representing 40.34% of the whole population. In 1900 the Town had grown to where 6,018 resided in the community and 2,397 of whom were Jews representing 39.83% of the population. By 1910 there was a community strength of 7,852 citizens and 2,997 Jews making up 38.16% of that citizenry. However, by 1921 there was a fall of some 1,879 inhabitants in the Town to 5,973. While 1,576 Jews represented 26.38% of that population, the Jewish presence here also decreased by some 1,421 Jews. With that substantial decrease, while it was quite possibly as a consequence of the effects of the First World War, we merely speculate. But here too, while this can be seen also that as a consequence of the 1,879 of the Towns non-Jewish community who were no longer on the census figures, 458 of these were other than their Jewish Neighbours.

However, in extrapolating from figures, it is all too easy to overlook in Human terms the cost in People this presents to us. From here also, and while the number of Jews are adding to the growing community and is gaining ground, for all Jews who could now gain any source of prominence in and around Delatyn, this increased steadily. By the commencement of World War II, that is borne out, as there were more than 3,000 Jews now living in and emulating their non-Jewish neighbours in and about the Town and in all spheres and walks of life. Here though we reach the invariable encroachment upon all Jewish life, as in September 1939, Poland fell to Hitler’s German forces in some 26 Days. Though fighting in various parts of Poland continued for another 6 days, effectively, Polish resistance ended with the capitulation of Poland in Warsaw, September 27th. 1939. For Delatyn, this all proved pivotal in the approaching crisis as it was the escape route for the Polish government seeking exile as it fled and abandoned the Polish nation.

The Polish government, fleeing through the Delatyn area enroute toward Romania, it is already conceded and recognised that no comfort could be gained for the Polish people’s left behind. Here in an abandoned nation, 6 million Polish citizens would eventually die, including the 3,000,000 Polish Jews who were systematically sought out for Slaughter. By the time of the Russian participation, September 29th. 1939, Stalin’s forces were moving swiftly to occupy the eastern sector of Poland and this included Delatyn. That same October a pseudo-Election was drawn up in the area, in which 93% of the population, of the now Western Ukraine, voted to leave the Ukraine and enjoined the Soviet Russian state. Delatyn was now a satellite community on the outskirts of Stalin’s realm and was affording of a limited security to the Jews seeking to remain here. During March and April 1940 Russian influences increasingly sought to deport from enormous tracts of these newer Soviet lands vast numbers of Jewish, Polish and Ukrainian political, religious and military leaders into Kazakhstan and Siberia.

While this exile amounted to an immediate and seeming saving grace for those Jews of Poland deported further East, many still succumbed to Russian atrocity. Then, with Hitler’s invasion of Russia, June 22nd. 1941, Delatyn was bombed and the position for any Jew within Nazi reach took on a far more destructive complexion. While Delatyn had a Judenrate established that July, located in the middle of the Shtetl, and the orderly curtailing of Jewish activity became central to the Nazi demands, hope was still extended to the belief that Poles, Ukrainians and indeed Jews were being liberated. On June 23rd. an advance party of motorcycle dispatch riders, units from General Karl von Stuelpnagel’s 17th. Army arrived in Delatyn. For his part Stuelpnagel would become implicated in measures aimed at suppressing Jews and then murdering them along his lines of communication. All the while, Stalin’s NKVD were ranging far and wide, assailing and murdering anyone they considered enemies of the new Soviet proposition.

On July 1st. the Germans fully occupied Delatyn and while the Jewish treatment was abuse and more abuse, the annihilation in greater numbers took its time arriving. In nearby Nadworna, which had been treated to an assault that saw 2,500 of its Jews already been Murdered at Bukowinka on October 6th., Delatyn was merely held in preparation for what was inevitably coming. This was more than half the Nadworna Jews of the Town murdered, which could not be suggested as other than intentioned. In Delatyn itself, a similar murderous operation was commenced which sought out the Jews from the non-Jewish Poles. On the night of October 15th. 1941, an elimination force surrounded Delatyn and here on the following day, October 16th. the Director of the Tatarow Border Police force, SS Haupscharfuhrer Ernst Varchmin ordered the 3rd company of Police Battalion 133, under Commander Rehbein to assist in the collection and murder of the Jews of Delatyn.

The rounding up of Delatyn’s Jews was the signal for the destruction to commence and when all of these Jews were gathered together, they were all taken to a woodworking factory where a final selection was made. Some of the younger Jews were kept as a workforce for the foreseeable future while the remainder, some 1,950 of Delatyn’s Jews were taken to Olchoviec and shot. Their remains were interred in 3 mass graves and a troubled calm settled upon the area. However, this mass assault would be but the first of five distinct aktionen against the Jewish Citizens of Delatyn. While most of the listed victims of the Jewish Murdered that took the Jews of Delatyn from us was accomplished during the years 1941, 1942, 1943 and 1944, Jews too were Murdered during the period of German occupation in 1939, and not ostensibly by German hands. Some of these Jews of Delatyn, those young and capable enough to be considered for forced labour were either shot in Stanislawow, during what would be the second action against them, or then transported to The Belzec Death Camp.

As a result of the third action, 200 Jews from Tatarow were brought by Varchmin and were murdered alongside some Jews of Delatyn. The fourth action took place in March 1942 when 200 of Delatyn’s Jews were detained and a further 256 Jews from the neighbouring villages and towns were corralled together in Delatyn itself. From here they were all taken to the nearby Jewish cemetery and murdered, 456 Jews then interred there. Trawling through the districts during the Summer, killing operations continued and toward the end of 1942, more than 200 Jews from Delatyn and the surrounding area were deported to The Belzec Death Camp. By September 1942 the Polish newspaper, basically translated as Polish glad tidings, ‘The Wiesci Polskie’, suggested that there were sources in Budapest who had reports from the Pruth River Valley and that the area from Delatyn to Worochta was now declared Judenrein. It becomes obvious to all who are reading the details of this intelligence information that the very meaning could not be interpreted other than that all Jews had been cleared from the area, eliminated, Murdered in killing aktionen, or in the Death Camps.

But Hitler’s annihilating agents had not quite done with Delatyn. During July 1943, a partisan group led by the Russian, Major-General Sydir Artemovych Kovpak was surrounded and decimated by the forces of General Andrey Andreyevich Vlasov in the vicinity of Delatyn. General Kovpak’s partisan’s had even included a number of Jews who had escaped the transports from Skalat to The Belzec Death Camp. Here though, they all fell to the superior fire power ranged against them and in Delatyn, the fifth killing action against their Jews was carried out during the winter of November and December 1943. While Nazi forces were being driven back from along the Russian Front, forces aligned with them, the renegades and collaborationists of Vlasov’s Army now surrounded Delatyn. During the night these combined forces started the shelling of the Town in a softening up exercise and as the people ran out into the street their panic played into the hands of the Murderers who shot them as the emerged.

Eventually though, the Nazis gathered all the Jews who remained in the town centre and ritually tortured and abused them. Partially alive, and even the dead Jews were not spared the final detail, they were loaded into trucks and taken to the Olchoviec forest. Here, some 712 Jews and 95 of their Ukrainians compatriots were finally interred after the remaining living had been murdered. At the end of 1943, the town was proclaimed finally free of its Jews as the remaining Delatyn Jews were sent to Stanislawow. Perhaps as late as January 1944 those expelled Jews of Delatyn finally perished. In Delatyn itself, the Nazis spent their short time remaining there confiscating and robbing all they could from Jewish homes, lands and estates. It is estimated that all but a handful of the 3,000 Jews of Delatyn had been murdered in Delatyn, its environs and the areas that surrounded it. All throughout the period, resistance took on a distinct flavour in the areas around Delatyn and Stanislawow. That said, the role of Jewish Resistance must not be overlooked.

Local Jews, some escaping transports to the Death Camps, Jews escaping from other Camps and Ghetto’s gravitated toward the resistance movement and made their way back toward Delatyn. Resistance therefore, as it was concentrated in and around Delatyn, and for long periods during the War, recognises that many of those Resister's fell in an unequal battle against a far superior equipped enemy. A resistance movement, and local to them emerged here at Delatyn. Amongst these, and there is a great need to add to their account for their bravery, persistence and tenacity are:- Mosze Akselrod, Egber Berisz, Jakow Goldner, Jakow Hecht, Dawid Huberman, Fimek Jarysz and Gitel Kolki are amongst the many killed in action. In fighting the extended reach of Hitler’s hatred for their own People, their heroism has yet to be fully measured. By the time in March 1944, when the Russian Army had reoccupied Delatyn, the addition to Hitler’s Final Solution for the Jews of Delatyn had been resolved here.

However, the end for Jewish fears did not conclude yet, as the sway of assault and counter offensive moved backwards and forwards across the entire region. On April 19th. Hitler’s forces were again within the limits of Delatyn’s confines. Eventually though, the weight of Russian offensiveness told and was pressed home and the Nazi’s were finally evicted on July 26th. 1944. From here, and through the Jablonica pass the Russian forces gathered its resources and assailed Hitler’s 6th. SS Army in Hungary, thus ending German presence in Hungary too. Today, in the Olchoviec Forest, at the northern tip of the town there is the collective graveyard, the final resting place to much that had previously existed of the Jewish presence of Delatyn. Though many other’s occupy the same space, this site belongs to the majority Jewish Murdered by systematic and sought out Hitlerite intention. Here, during the period 1941 till 1943, the local and area Jews were shot and interred here and throughout the entire area also.

While the memorial to the Jews of Delatyn carries an inscription in the languages of the area, recognising the Jewish presence has been all but obliterated, we cannot fully confirm the place of execution of all these Jews. On May 8th. 1945, as World War II comes to an end in Europe, the World must now come to terms with what it knew, what it chose to know or decided ignore with regards to the Slaughter of 6,000,000 Jewish Men, Women and Their Children. As part of that assessment, and in relation to what emerges from the tragedy of Delatyn, on May 6th. 1968 this vicious SS Hauptscharfuhrer Ernst Varchmin, a brutal antisemitc hater, and others of his kind, were tried in the Higher District Court, the aptly named Stanislawow Trial, at the ‘Landgericht Munster.’ Indicted over the mass Murder, the group and individual shooting’s and the deportations of 1,000’s of Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians into The Death Camps and not just from Delatyn but from Bukowina, Dolina, Jablonica, Kalucz, Nadworna, Rohatyn, Stanislawow, Tatarow, Worochta and Wyskow.

Finally, to bring a curtain down on the scenes of atrocity abounding in and around Delatyn, on July 13th. 1972, Ernst Varchmin was sentenced to life imprisonment by the West German Federal Supreme Court, the ‘Bundesgerichtshof’ for his Crimes Against Humanity, mostly Jewish Humanity. But Humanity could not be stilled and much that has been taken from Jewish existence here has proven that not all recognition of the acts of depravity has been totally lost. Also, and in a form of commemoration, in a poems titled Shot by Stephen Herz he actually mentions Delatyn. Here, along with many lost Jewish Community’s and from among those other places of atrocity, we hear the name Delatyn ring out. Herz focuses also his accusation as he relates some of his lines to those who also participated and perpetrated these crimes.

Shot

"..shot in the synagogue

shot up against the wall in the headlights

of the truck

shot in the farmyard by the dung heap

shot in the hospital, the maternity ward

shot in the city, the town, the shtetl

shot in their houses, in the streets, in the market square

shot in the cemetery

shot in the warehouse after machine-gun muzzles were pushed through holes in the walls

shot in the roundups trying to escape

shot in bed

shot in their cribs

shot in the air, the baby thrown over its mother's head

shot because they stole a potato

shot because they were betrayed for a kilo of sugar

shot because they weren't wearing the yellow star

shot because they were wearing the yellow star

shot by the Einsatzgruppen

shot by the Reserve Battalion of the German Order Police

shot by the Gestapo Firing Squad

shot by the Waffen SS and the Higher SS

shot by the Hiwis-Ukrainian, Latvian, and Lithuanian volunteers

shot by the Hungarian Fascist Nyilas, the Arrow Cross

shot by the Polish police and Polish partisans

shot by the Croatian Ustasa

shot by the Romanian army, police, gendarmerie, border guard, civilians, and the Iron Guard

shot by the Wehrmacht

shot by old men in the German Home Guard

shot by young boys in the Hitler Youth

shot in Aktion after Aktion as if it was "more or less our daily bread"

shot in the search-and-destroy mission, the Jew Hunt

shot in the "harvest festival," the Erntefest

shot in order to make the northern Lublin district judenrein

shot in Zhitomir, Poniatowa, Jozefow, Trawniki

shot in Lomazy, Parczew, Bialystok, Kharkov

shot in Bialowieza, Lukow, Riga, Poltava

shot in Miedzyrzec, Khorol, Kremenstshug

shot in Slutsk, Bobruisk, Mogilev, Vinnitsa

shot in Odessa, Lvov, Kolmyja, Minsk, Rovno

shot in Majdanek and Brest-Litovsk

shot in Neu Sandau and Tarnopol and Rohatin

shot in Dnepropetrovsk

shot in Kovno, Pinsk, Berdichev, Tarnow

shot in Kamenets-Podolski

shot in Krakow, Szczebrzeszyn, Siauliai

shot in Stolin, Kielce, Lutsk, Serokomla

shot in Drogobych, Luga, DELATYN

shot in the Warsaw Ghetto

shot in the ravine of Babi Yar

shot in Bilgoraj, Nadvornaya, Stanislawow

shot in David Grodek, Janow Podlesia

shot near Zamosc." Stephen Herz.

Finally, as the names of the lost are a memory of what we will ensure must never be erased, and these names that are listed below are but a tiny account of those who were finally Murdered. However, they do fully stand as symbols of those grave wrongs which have never been judicioulsy accounted for. In my effort, and while there are many Jews of Delatyn presented with their given Surnames, I have only chosen to list those who are identified in both Forename and Surname. This leaves an immense hollow where memory does no credit to the burden of Remembrance. It is important for us to recall though that of the fallen, we can know there was the presence for all too many of an entire Family with but a Surname known. The future tragedy, with no one left to represent them as they were, those who were all destroyed at the same place and on the same date, we can only look to the names presented.

This effort though, where names are either listed or not, could have included many other’s of their families names, the relatives and kin without fuller names but we know they had lived. All too often what has been written into the detail of the crimes commited against these Jewish People, where there might be a spouse name that is missing, or the names of Their Children which cannot be recalled from our past, we should never allow for their presence to be forgotten. Though there are many Jewish Murdered who have been listed and are not to be forgotten, their contemporaries must form another account given over to the scarcity of the information that must prove necessary. We have thus far gained little of the fuller content of the atrocity delivered to the Jews of Delatyn here, but we persist in memory of the more than 3,000 Jews of we know are lost to us.

Moses Abasch, Israel Aberbach, Abrum Abosch, Hersch Abosch, Jakub Abosch, Mosze Akselrod, Chana Aldesberg, Chana Altman, Israel Anzug, Mendel Auch, Dawid Auschusman, Frida Auschusman, Hersch Auschusman, Abrum Auschustman, Abrum Aviusdemon, Meiler Babed, Eugenia Bandel, Jakub Bandel, Pinia Bandel, Rifka Bandel, Yosio Bandel, Adam Bartfel, Josef Bartfeld, Sara Bartfeld, Kramer Bartko, Hersch Berger, Ilias Berger, Schaia Berger, Yuda Berger, Egber Berisz, Karl Bernstein, Tuli Bibmoni, Moses Bilberg, Asias Birkenhelt, Dawid Bitman, Isak Bitman, Naftaly Bitman, Rifka Blach, Burah Blai, Burich Blai, Halia Blai, Maia Blai, Moses Blai, Rifka Blai, Issio Blater, Chaim Blei, Dawid Blei, Herz Blimenstesch, Jakov Blitner, Chana Bloch, Chaim Bloch, Dwoira Bloch, Michel Bloch, Pinkas Sammel Bloch, Samson Bloch, Schmala Bloch, Tomas Bloch, Elias Bluch, Kasimira Bluhspefi, Hersch Boder, Abrum Bomer, Osias Breitler, Abram Bresler, Abrum Bresler, Israel Bresler, Pinkas Bresler, Sara Bresler, Singer Bresler, Tauba Bresler, Aron Brin, Wolf Brunwaser, Chana Buchwald, Enta Buchwald, Leibusch Buchwald, Michal Buchwald, Ribel Buchwald, Salomon Chasker, Adas (Adam) Dachs, Frida Dachs, Schimon Dachs, Sora Dachs,

Abraham DEMNER, Feiga DEMNER, Josef DEMNER, Moses DEMNER, Seida DEMNER,

Isak Dener, Lea Dener, Frida Denmer, Frida Denner, Isa Denner, Liba Denner, Pin Denner, Salamon Denner, Salamon Diamant, Josef Dikker, Efroim Dinet, Maks Dinet, Cirla Drimer, Dawid Drimer, Stelko Drimer, Yosio Drimer, Yoslio Drucker, Abrum Druker, Chana Druker, Jakub Druker, Hersch Dulberg, Naftaly Dunker, Fredi Einstein, Moses Endelstein, Cirla Enkerentent, Schaia Fange, Chaia Fanzer, Aron Felzenstein, Frania Fenster, Frima Fenster, Josifa Fenster, Rifka Fenster, Zauder Fimel, Abraham Flamer, Sosim Flor, Zoia Flur, Leiso Fraim, Herz Franwal, Chana Fridfertig, Dwoira Fridfertig, Itzak Fridfertig, Moses Fridfertig, Rimka Fridfertig, Boruh Fridfertik, Reg Fridfertik, Juda Fridman, Yuda Fridman, Naftaly Fritz, Alter Fuchs, Elsa Fuchs, Emma Fuchs, Enta Fuchs, Hersch Fuchs, Moses Fuchs, Schpak Fuchs, Emma Gah, Pincas Gas, Samuel Gerner, Fichs Gildenrad, Frida Gildenrad, Inka Gildenrad, Isa Gildenrad, Israil Gildenrad, Mordko Gildenrad, Osias Gildenrad, Rafail Gildenrad, Rifka Gildenrad, Sura Gildenrad, Yosio Gildenrad, Berta Ginselrad, Feifel Ginselrad, Frania Ginselrad, Mordko Ginselrad, Pina Ginselrad, Rifka Ginselrad, Liman Girt, Pepi Gitman, Semon Gitman, Simon Gitman, Chaim Glaser, Emma Glaser, Emner Glaser, Hersch Glaser, Ivan Glaser, Mordko Glaser, Isa Glauser, Schirinda Glauser, Freilia Goh, Isa Goh, Jakow Goldner, Sala Goldstein, Yister Goldstein, Yonas Golstent, Israel Gommer, Sala Gommer, Schaider Gorder, Ruchla Gortstein, Isa Grifel, Berta Grin, Mordko Grin, Dawid Grinberg, Moses Grinstein, Herz Grosman, Moses Grosman, Grin Gruber, Hersch Gunderman, Dwoira Gutes, Grischko Gutes, Leib Haber, Frida Haf, Samuel Haf, Rifka Haftman, Leopold Hammer, Sala Hammer, Salamon Hammer, Jakow Hecht, Hersch Herman, Salamon Herner, Grin Hersch, Nuta Hersch, Marian Hilman, Rafael Hindelrat, Salomon Hofman, Perla Hoker, Dawid Huberman, Salomon Hunderman, Sura Hunderman, Sara Imerkler, Fimek Jarysz, Stein Kalin, Sala Kamil, Israel Kandil, Fraer Kanfer, Glonton Kanfer, Dino Kard, Marcus Katz, Leib Keifer, Israel Kenig, Israel Kirchiner, Kastrol Kischner, Polbert Kleimer, Jakob Klingelfeld, Chaim Knol, Fischel Knol, Hersch Knol, Leon Knol, Leibusch Kofer, Aron Kofler, Dawid Kofler, Leib Kofler, Schaiba Kofler, Gitel Kolki, Josef Kolmenberg, Mina Kolstan, Dwoira Komarnik, Guda Komarnik, Israel Komarnik, Motio Komarnik, Blima Komornik, Chaia Komornik, Dwoira Komornik, Feiga Komornik, Emma Komornik, Isak Komornik, Israel Komornik, Mechel Komornik, Michael Komornik, Ruchla Komornik, Schloma Komornik, Rosa Korkel, Frida Korn, Karl Korn, Lipa Korn, Poem Korn, Yuda Korn, Bartko Kramer, Beila Kreitman, Leon Krisman, Mina Kudasch, Selven Kudisc, Atonas Kuker, Marcus Kuker, Pinkas Kuker, Piza Kuker, Sura Kuker, Schmidt Kupfer, Lea Kupfer, Pincas Laert, Ester Laet, Emalin Lagutman, Moses Lakriz, Dwoira Lander, Leon Langer, Reiklei Leisor, Leib Lenowel, Rifka Libman, Osias Libtez, Ruchla Lorbert, Fimel Lortel, Isak Marat, Saul Margman, Issak Margosched, Dr. Isak Margules, Dr. Leib Margules, Solomon Marh, Dawid Marks, Blai Meier, Leib Meier, Leib Meiseles, Yuda Melna, Senda Mendel, Sobel Mendel, Rifka Mendel-Freir, Jakub Menschenfreind, Adasch Michal, Israel Moker, Pina Moker, Pinkas Moker, Rosa Moker, Yonas Moker, Avadia Nadel, Gusen Nadel, Haskel Nadel, Michal Nadel, Hersch Neiman, Hersch Neuman, Leit Neutman, Guda Nodel, Jacub Nodel, Hersch Norman, Naftaly Orenstein, Sander Orenstein, Alexander Osadze, Tkinaliy Paster, Mendel Pauker, Otto Peril, Abraham Petranker, Chaim Petranker, Hersch Petranker, Josef Petranker, Leib Petranker, Selven Petranker, Maia Phemer, Mosa Pheter, Moses Pheter, Haftman Piker, Ten Piker, Isak Piler, Rifka Piner, Pinkas Pirkel, Froila Pitnia, Maia Pitnia, Moses Pitnia, Motel Pivtnia, Yusa Pitnia, Chaim Plac, Hersch Plac, Ihalo Plac, Isak Plac, Ansa Plivler, Hersch Plivner, Sima Posternak, Abraham Preminger, Jakub Preminger, Abraham Quartler, Chana Quartler, Abraham Radgaur, Martin Radgaur, Moses Radgaur, Abraham Ransner, Husler Raschner, Moses Rasentrendler, Chaim Reiser, Isa Reiser, Leib Risel, Rifka Risel, Israel Rodser, Leib Rodser, Rosa Rodser, Osias Rosen, Strois Rosmus, Traus Roten, Rifka Sager, Salomon Sak, Abraham Sandel, Elia Schafer, Herman Schafer, Leib Schafer, Muso Schafer, Otto Schafer, Pinkas Schafer, Tekla Schafer, Moses Schaffer, Dawid Schaufman, Rubel Schazberg, Hersch Schechter, Zita Schefr, Isak Scheiner, Israel Scheiner, Leib Scheiner, Pinkas Scherf, Hersch Scheringer, Hecht Schimon, Israel Schiz, Frima Schlaer, Mendel Schleimer, Jacub Schneider, Fanz Schort, Salomon Schraf, Touba Schreier, Abraham Schuchter, Moses Schuchter, Emma Schunsenger, Rita Schunsenger, Chana Schwarz, Ester Schwarz, Gedowin Schwarz, Samnel Schwarz, Samuel Schwarz, Marcus Seger, Rifka Serwaser, Salo Serwaser, Chaim Sisler, Michail Smik, Buruh Sobel, Josef Stal, Jakub Stander, Pinkas Stanger, Frael Stein, Froel Stein, Froim Stein, Etna Steinbach, Isif Steinberg, Michael Sternberg, Abraham Storg, Boruch Storg, Emma Storg, Eugeniy Storg, Fimel Storg, Huda Storg, Leib Storg, Moses Storg, Schimon Storg, Yonas Storg, Salomon Straus, Schimon Streiberg, Alter Strum, Gisela Strum, Polin Strum, Hersch Suker, Mania Sunderman, Perla Sunderman, Abraham Tabasch, Ila Tage, Elsa Tager, Feila Tager, Osias Tager, Salamon Tager, Schaj Tager, Dawid Tank, Hersch Taper, Elias Tauber, Moses Tauber, Emelian Taubman, Josef Taubman, Leib Taubman, Moses Taubman, Schimon Taubman, Yosio Taubman, Ida Tauborg, Feder Taufman, Josef Taufman, Moses Taufman, Bertko Teibman, Leib Teibman, Pepe Teibman, Leib Teisman, Babcia Toker, Isak Traurer, Frida Trauser, Josef Treimer, Emanuel Triper, Chaim Wakner, Dr. Kornela Walah, Ida Waldhorn, Jakub Walthorn, Friz Wantelberg, Hersch Weingart, Chaim Weingarten, Hersch Weingarten, Sima Weingarten, Ester Israel Weis, Ciba Wener, Dawid Wener, Emma Wener, Salomon Witman, Jacub Wulderman, Berl Wunderman, Gidal Wunderman, Pinkas Wunderman, Selda Wunderman, Simon Wunderman, Zachariy Wunderman, Ida Yarlih, Aron Zangler, Fipel Zauder, Moses Zauder, Mordko Zawder, Salamon Zawder, Abraham Zeider, Fimel Zeider, Hersch Zeider, Isak Zeider, Marko Zeider, Salomon Zeider, Chaia Zial, Jacub Zial, Natan Zifer, Abraham Zimer, Emma Zimer, Hersch Zimer, Israel Zimer, Josef Zimer, Wolf Zimer, Karol Zimerman, Lina Zimerman, Mordko Zimerman, Sanda Zimerman, Seida Zimerman, Senda Zimerman, Moses Zimet, Maria Zimringer, Binamin Ziper, Rifka Zuker, Salomon Zwerk.

Through these final deeds, the Surnames of The Lost cannot be forgotten and though they are not as accurate an account as we would wish to have known, these are the Surnames containing losses to Delatyn of 3,000 of its Jews, and perhaps more. All too often too, the names hide the depth of the tragedy meted out to these Jewish People for merely being Jews. My great fear in searching through the Catastrophe though is in missing a single name, not by intent nor omission purposely, but not seeing what is there to be recalled and therefore Remembered, the names of Human Beings whose act of life was extinguished because of a hatred for their existence.

Abash, Aberbach, Abisz, Abosch, Abosh, Abush, Abusz, Abysz, Adlershtein, Ajtman, Akselrod, Aldesberg, Altenhaus, Altenhauz, Alter, Altman, Angstrajch, Ankertrajch, Anzug, Arnold, Aron, Auch, Auerbach, Aurszpringer, Aushesman, Auchussman, Auschusman, Auschussman, Auschussmann, Auschustman, Austein, Avieusdemon.

Babed, Babette, Balai, Balok, Bandel, Barlas, Baron, Bash, Bartfel, Bartfeld, Bartko, Bauer, Bawar, Beisner, Berle, Berger, Berisz, Bernstein, Bibmoni, Bikel, Bikil, Bilberg, Birkenhelt, Bitman, Bittman, Bittmann, Bivering, Blach, Blai, Blaj, Blater, Blatter, Blay, Blei, Blimenstesch, Blitner, Bloch, Block, Blokh, Bluch, Bludstein, Bluhspefi, Boder, Bomer, Boniuvka, Breitler, Bresler, Bressler, Brig, Brin, Bring, Brinshtein, Bronshtein, Brukel, Brunwaser, Buchwald, Burger, Bursztajn.

Calmus, Cauderer, Ceuder, Chasker, Chtorh, Comarnic, Cyglob.

Dachner, Dachs, Daniel, Deen, DEMNER, Dener, Denmer, Denner, Deutsch, Deutscher, Diamand, Diamant, Diamond, Dicker, Diker, Dikker, Dinet, Dojtner, Dornfeld, Drimer, Drucker, Dulberg, Dunker.

Edelstein, Eichenstein, Eilenberg, Einhorn, Einstein, Eisenberg, Eisner, Elenberg, Endelstein, Engel, Engelman, Engelmann, Engler, Enkerentent, Erlich.

Faler, Fange, Fanzer, Feder, Feierwerker, Feler, Felzenstein, Fenster, Fernhoff, Ferster, Feuer, Fimel, Fischbach, Fishbakh, Flamer, Fleiser, Fliegler, Flor, Flur, Fogel, Fojgel, Forster, Fraim, Franwal, Freier, Freiwald, Fribler, Friedfertig, Fridfertig, Fridfertik, Fridlender, Fridman, Fritz, Frydfertig, Fuchs, Fucs, Fuks.

Gah, Ganc, Ganz, Gas, Gelber, Gerner, Gildenrad, Ginselrad, Girt, Gitman, Glaser, Glasman, Glauser, Glazer, Goh, Goldberg, Goldner, Goldstaen, Goldstein, Golstent, Goldsztein, Goldsztejn, Gommer, Gorder, Gortstein, Grifel, Grin, Grinberg, Grindlinger, Grinstein, Grosman, Grossfeld, Gruber, Gunderman, Gutes, Gryn.

Haber, Hacher, Hacker, Haf, Haftman, Halem, Hammer, Hass, Hausler, Hecht, Heiferman, Helem, Heller, Helm, Hendel, Henig, Herman, Herner, Hersch, Herszkowicz, Hertl, Hilman, Hillman, Hilt, Hindelrat, Hittmann, Hoch, Hochman, Hofman, Hoker, Horenreikh, Horner, Hornreich, Horowicz, Huberman, Hunderman, Hundert.

Imerkler, Iung.

Jahr, Jar, Jarysz, Jung, Juran.

Kalin, Kalman, Kalper, Kalperfeld, Kamiel, Kamil, Kaminer, Kandil, Kanfer, Karabczewski, Kard, Katz, Kazwan, Keifer, Kenig, Kerker, Kirchner, Kischner, Kitner, Kleimer, Klein, Kleiner, Klingelfeld, Klingenfeld, Knobl, Knol, Knoll, Knor, Koch, Koenig, Kofer, Koffer, Kofler, Kolki, Kolmenberg, Kolstan, Komarnik, Komornik, Komornyk, Kopelman, Korkel, Korn, Kornsztein, Kotz, Kraemer, Kramer, Kranz, Kratz, Krauthamer, Kreindler, Kreitman, Krekar, Krell, Kremer, Kressel, Kriegsman, Krigsman, Krisman, Krothamer, Krygsman, Kucer, Kudasch, Kudisc, Kugler, Kuker, Kupfer, Kusznir, Kwartler.

Laden, Laert, Laet, Lagutman, Lakriz, Landau, Lander, Langer, Lappe, Larisch, Lauber, Lautman, Lautmann, Laytner, Leibovitz, Leisor, Lenowel, Lewin, Libman, Libtez, Lichtenschtein, Lichtenstein, Lifschitz, Lifshitz, Linder, Linka, Lipschitz, Liser, Lorber, Lorbert, Lortel.

Maier, Majer, Malter, Marat, Margalit, Margman, Margolis, Margosched, Margules, Margulies, Marh, Mark, Marks, Marmorstein, Marton, Mauthner, Mautner, Mayze, Mazes, Meiblum, Meier, Meiseles, Melna, Mendel, Mendel-Freir, Menschenfreind, Menschenfreund, Menshenfrend, Menshenfroind, Menszenfreind, Michal, Moker, Moster.

Nacbar, Nachbar, Nadel, Nagelberg, Nagler, Neiman, Neuman, Nodel, Norman, Normand, Normann, Nottes

Ohrenstein, Orenstain, Orenstein, Orensztein, Ornstein, Osadze.

Paster, Pasvag, Pauker, Pelc, Peril, Perl, Petranker, Petrower, Phemer, Pheter, Piker, Piler, Piner, Piper, Pirkel, Pitnia, Pivtnia, Plac, Platz, Plec, Plirtz, Plivler, Plivner, Posternak, Preis, Preminger, Pressler, Pribler, Printz, Privler, Priwler.

Quartler.

Radgaur, Raihter, Ransner, Raschner, Rasentrendler, Ratner, Regenstreif, Reghinstraif, Reiser, Reizel, Remler, Respler, Riesel, Risel, Rizenberg, Rodser, Rosen, Rosenberg, Rosenblatt, Rosenfeld, Rosmus, Rot, Roten, Rotfeld, Rozen, Rozenberg, Rozenfeld, Rozenkranc, Rubin, Rusel.

Safran, Safrin, Sager, Sak, Sala, Sandel, Schaerf, Schafer, Schaffe, Scharf, Schauman, Schazberg, Schechter, Schefr, Scheiner, Scherf, Scheringer, Schimon, Schiz, Schlaer, Schleien, Schleimer, Schletter, Schlosser, Schmerler, Schmerzler, Schneider, Schoenfeld, Schorr, Schort, Schraf, Schreber, Schreiber, Schreier, Schtorch, Schtrum, Schuchter, Schunsenger, Schwartz, Scic, Seger, Seid, Serwaser, Serwasser, Shinold, Shitz, Shlemer, Shmertzler, Shreier, Shtaner, Shvartz, Sielber, Silber, Silberhertz, Silwer, Sisler, Smik, Smolinski, Sobel, Socol, Somer, Sovol, Spigel, Sprechman, Spritzer, Spund, Stal, Stamler, Stander, Stanger, Stein, Steinbach, Steinberg, Stern, Sternberg, Storch, Storg, Straus, Streiberg, Strum, Suesler, Suker, Sunderman, Szafer, Szauber, Szic, Szneider, Sztigman, Sztrum.

Tabasch, Tagar, Tage, Tager, Tagor, Taler, Tahler, Tank, Taper, Tauber, Taubman, Taubmann, Tauborg, Taufman, Teger, Teibman, Teig, Teisman, Thaler, Tillinger, Toi, Toker, Touibman, Trajber, Traurer, Trauser, Traysser, Treimer, Triper, Troper, Tuchmann, Turteltaub, Tzigenlaub, Tzoiderer.

Udelsman, Unger.

Vaingarten, Videlman, Vilder, Vizelman, Vogman, Vunderman.

Wakner, Walah, Waldhorn, Walthorn, Wantelberg, Weber, Weich, Weingart, Weingarten, Weingold, Weinreb, Weis, Weisberst, Weissberg, Weissenberg, Wener, Wiener, Wiesel, Witles, Witman, Witteles, Woal, Woinilower, Wulderman, Wunderman.

Yarlih.

Zager, Zangler, Zankel, Zauder, Zauderer, Zaunkoenig, Zawder, Zeider, Zeuder, Zial, Ziegenlaub, Zifer, Ziglaub, Zilber, Zilberherz, Zimer, Zimerman, Zimet, Zimmer, Zimringer, Zinger, Zin, Zins, Ziper, Zirler, Zisler, Zommer, Zucher, Zuker, Zwerk, Zyngier.




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